Run Wild! Run Rivers! Rafting Blog

Archive for the ‘Colorado River Rafting’ Category

Fall Grand Canyon Rafting Project-Painting Side Tubes

Posted by

After the Grand Canyon rafting season ends it is time to start preparing for next April.  One of the projects that we undertake is the maintenance on our side tubes.  This entails fixing any problems and painting the tubes.  We do this work In Fredonia, AZ aka the “Center of the Universe.”

fall rafting projects

The Side Tubes for Grand Canyon Rafting

The first step is to take the tubes out of the warehouse and inflate them outside of our building.  Once the tubes are inflated we check to see if any of the tubes are leaking air or need rubber work.  Then we fix any and all problems by sanding and glueing patches back onto the tubes.  It is amazing how well these tubes hold up.  They are built incredibly well.  Most of our sidetubes were built by the Uniroyal Tire company.  The biggest problem this year seemed to be the grommet patch on the front of the nose of the tube that we lace to our raft and use as a step for our whitewater rafting guests.  Some of the grommets had been pulled out by the incredible force that is placed on these grommets as large waves hit and try to separate the sidetube from the raft.

After the patching and glueing was done it was time to start sanding the old loose paint off of the tubes.  This is a time consuming task but sometimes it is nice to do a project that you don’t have to think about too much and can just let your mind wander.  Once the tubes are  sanded down we have to mask them so we don’t get paint on the places we don’t want.  Then it is time for the painting.  This is the best part of the project.

Painting the side tubes goes quickly and it is great to see how good the tubes look.

The South Rim and The Power House Building

Posted by

The last couple of days we have been at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon for our annual Grand Canyon National Park Concession meetings.  It was good to see all of our fellow river outfitters and National Park personnel.  Time was spent reviewing our past season and what to expect for next year.  We always feel lucky to travel to the South Rim and peer down into the abyss of the Grand Canyon.  It is a spiritual experience and it reminds us of the exciting and fun times rafting along the Colorado River.

At the head of the Bright Angel Trail there is a new, very nice area complete with bathrooms to wait for fellow hikers.  The Kolb studio was showcasing some amazing paintings of the Grand Canyon many of which were for sale.  If you get to the rim definitely check out the artwork on display.  Other highlights included waking up to dusting of light snow and running along the rim of the Grand Canyon along the “Trail of Time.”

Another thing we got to check out was the “Power House” building.  There is talk to take this incredible old building, which used two Fairbanks-Morse continuous-duty Type D Diesel generators to supply power to the South Rim, and transform it into a museum for art or historic boats of the Grand Canyon.  The building has a lot of character with high ceilings and lots of windows.  The generators are still there as well as the power switches with their original labels:  Indian Garden Pump; El Tovar; Fire Pump; Bright Angel Lights and Power; USNPS; Train Yard; Turbine Cooling Tower; Power House.  On the other side of the building is the old Ice House where ice was made to supply the lodges and restaurants.  It will be exciting to see what becomes of the Power House over the next couple of years.

 

 

 

Paddling Strokes for Beginners [Infographic]

Posted by

Paddling Strokes Infographic by CRATEINCC.R.A.T.E., Colorado River and Trail Expeditions presents a wonderful Infographic titled ‘Paddling Strokes for Beginners’. It has been created to outline the basics of paddling a raft. It adumbrates the 6 common paddle strokes a rafter must be efficient at.

The Infographic reveals:

  • Names and visual guide of the different types of stokes
  • The effect of each stroke while rafting
  • ‘How-to’ steps for each stroke

Paddling Guides for Dummies: How to Paddle a River Raft [Infographic]

Posted by

Paddling a river raft is pretty challenging task for beginners as they have to work as a team to guide the raft down a river and through whitewater rapids. Paddling involves both skill and the ability to work with others as a team.

 

C.R.A.T.E., Colorado River and Trail Expeditions presents wonderful Infographic titled ‘Paddling Guides for Dummies: How to Paddle a River Raft’. It has been created to outline the basics of paddling for beginners. It adumbrates the common paddling techniques a rafter must be efficient at.

The Infographic reveals:

  • Names and visual guide of the different paddling techniques
  • The effect of each paddling technique
  • ‘How-to’ steps for paddlingPaddling Guide for Dummies Infographic by CRATEINC

Interesting Things You Need To Know About the Grand Canyon

Posted by

 

Planning a vacation to Grand Canyon? Given below are some interesting things about this amazing year-round holiday destination. Increase your basic knowledge about this natural wonder and make the most of your holidays.

Grand Canyon Vacation

The Grand Canyon is full of beautiful waterfalls hidden in its side canyons.

 

  • The Grand Canyon is 277 miles long and 18 miles wide
  • There are a lot of controversies related to the age of the Canyon. Earlier studies state that the Canyon is 5-6 million years old (“60-Million-Year Debate on Grand Canyon’s Age”. New York Times.)
  • A study published in journal Science in December 2012 revealed that the Grand Canyon could be as old as 70 Million years.
  • The Grand Canyon has amazing wildlife. It has approximately 70 species of mammals, 250 species of birds, and 25 different types of reptiles.
  • Of the various reptile species that are found in the park, the Grand Canyon Pink Rattlesnakes are quite interesting.  They have evolved in a way that their color is similar to the rock layers around them.
  • Although first afforded Federal protection in 1893 as a Forest Reserve and later as a National Monument, Grand Canyon did not achieve National Park status until 1919, three years after the creation of the National Park Service.
  • Grand Canyon National Park covers a total area of 1900 square miles and is roughly 277 river miles long
  • Archeological remains from the following culture groups are found in Grand Canyon National Park: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Basketmaker, Ancestral Puebloan (Kayenta and Virgin branches), Cohonina, Cerbat, Pai, Southern Paiute, Zuni, Hopi, Navajo, and Euro-American

 

There are millions of facts and stories about the Grand Canyon. You can learn about them by reading books and researching online.  The information gathered can lead to a better understanding of the Grand Canyon and surrounding areas on your vacation.

 

 

 

Grand Canyon Vacation: Tips for First Timers

Posted by
Save Grand Canyon From Uranium Mining

The Grand Canyon is a great place to plan your next vacation.

Planning a trip to Grand Canyon is both exciting and confusing. If you are going to Grand Canyon for the first time, here are some tips to help you plan nearly perfect Grand Canyon family vacation:

 

  • First and foremost, check out the weather before you start with all the preparations. You can search the web to find out the best time to visit the Canyon. The period between March and May and then from September till November is considered to be the best time to enjoy vacations in Grand Canyon. Summers are warm and busy. To enjoy discounts and offers, you may plan your holidays in the winter months though you may have to bear the cold.

 

  • Next you must decide how you will get there. Depending on the availability of time, your budget, and personal choice, you may reach the Grand Canyon by train, or you may board a flight or drive on your own.

 

  • Decide which part of the Canyon you want to visit. South Rim is ideal for family vacation due to abundance of services and hotels. If however you are looking for fun and adventure, visit Grand Canyon North Rim. North Rim is quieter than the South Rim and is ideal for couples as well. If you want to avoid going on high altitudes and want to experience the bottom of the Grand Canyon instead, consider Grand Canyon West on the Hualapai Indian Reservation.

 

  • Make a list of things that you would want to do when in Grand Canyon. Exciting Colorado River rafting trips, hiking, biking, mule rides, and Grand Canyon air tours are some of the endless things you can do out there. Browse the web to find out what’s best to do in Grand Canyon. You may take help of a tour operator to plan the itinerary depending on the availability of time and your personal interest.

 

Finally, make the bookings well in advance and confirm them before you leave. Ensure that everything is in order and you would have a great time on your Grand Canyon vacation.

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions Receives Second Tripadvisor Certificate of Excellence

Posted by
Certificate of Excellence 2013

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions has been honored with this award for 2013

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions has been awarded a 2013 Certificate of Excellence from Tripadvisor.com for its rafting trips.  This is the second straight year C.R.A.T.E.  has received this accolade, which honors hospitality excellence.  This accolade is only given to tour companies that consistently achieve outstanding reviews on Tripadvisor from their guests.  Only about 10% of those companies and organizations listed with Tripadvisor.com receive this prestigious award.

In order to qualify for this award CRATE had to maintain an almost perfect rating as reviewed by travelers.  Additional criteria included the volume of reviews received during the past 12 months.

CRATE is honored to be rated so highly by their guests and is grateful for all of its wonderful employees who put together such wonderful trips.

 

 

 

RaftGrandCanyon.com a great information website for Grand Canyon Rafting

Posted by
Raft Grand Canyon

RaftGrandCanyon.com is a great information site for planning a Grand Canyon rafting trip.

The website RaftGrandCanyon.com is a great information tool to use to plan a Grand Canyon rafting expedition.  The site has information about the different type of boats, the different river sections of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, and a timeline of events in the Grand Canyon.  In addition the website contains information about the early river runners and advice about what time of year to raft the Grand Canyon.  Colorado River & Trail Expeditions who has been under original ownership for over 40 years believes this is the best Grand Canyon information site on the web for those who don’t know a lot about rafting the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

There are all kinds of different boats used in the Grand Canyon.  There are motorized rafts, oar rafts, paddle boats, kayaks, and dories.  The website shows photos of the different boats and explains the advantages of each craft.

When doing a grand canyon rafting tour there are always choices to be made concerning how many days guests want to spend on the river and if guests want to do a complete trip or just a partial trip.  The website explains about the options available and what you will see.

RaftGrandCanyon.com also has a timeline of events in the Grand Canyon and a brief summary about the early rafters and explorers in the Grand Canyon.  Do you want to know about John Wesley Powell, how about when Grand Canyon was declared a National Park, or which president enlarged it to its present size.  This website contains a plethora of Grand Canyon information.

When planning a trip to the Grand Canyon a common question is which month is the best time to raft the Grand Canyon.  The RaftGrandCanyon.com website has an entire page devoted to this question and points out the positives and negatives of each Spring, Summer, and Fall month.

If you are planning a commercial rafting trip, a private rafting trip, or just looking for some information about the Grand Canyon.  Make sure to take a look at RaftGrandCanyon.com.

Chicken Salad Recipe

Posted by

Over the years, we’ve had many compliments and questions about the meals we prepare on our river trips.  We thought we would share a recipe with those of you who would like to try preparing one of more popular lunches at home.

Chicken Salad Wraps (Serves approx. 5)

– 2-3 Cans (7.5 oz) Canned Chicken- 2 Cups Celery
– 1-2 Tomatoes
– 1 Cucumber
– 1 Red Onion
– 2 Cups Red Grapes
– 1 Cup Whole Cashews
– 1 Head of Romaine or Iceberg Lettuce
– Mayonnaise
-1 Package of Tortillas

Open/drain the Canned Chicken and add to a large bowl.  Dice Celery, Tomatoes, Cucumber and Red Onion and add to the bowl.  Shred the Lettuce and add to the bowl.  Add Red Grapes (can be whole or sliced in half) and Cashews.  Add enough Mayonnaise to get the consistency you want and mix all the ingredients together.

Serve in a tortilla and enjoy!

484488_10150995903518302_1482498471_n4242_82386093301_6722521_n

Spring in Canyonlands Rafting, Hiking, and Geology with Wayne Ranney a GREAT SUCCESS!!

Posted by

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions April 27-May 6, 2013 Spring in Canyonlands Trips was hosted by geologist and author Wayne Ranney.  The trip included 6 nights camping on the banks of the Green and Colorado Rivers in Stillwater and Cataract Canyon.  In addition 3 nights were spent at Red Cliff’s Lodge on the banks of the Colorado River above Moab.  Everyone arrived at Red Cliff’s Lodge the evening of April 27.  On April 28 Wayne led a land based tour around the Island in the Sky district of Canyonlands National Park.  Stops included Upheavel Dome and the Canyonland’s overlook of the Turk’s Head.  The tour came back to Moab via the Shafer Trail.

The next day, after a quick suburban ride to the Moab airport everyone was loaded onto planes for a 10 minute flight into the bottom of Stillwater Canyon.  The flight was spectacular in every sense.  The Plane flew down Hell Roaring Canyon most of the time under the rim of the plateau.  Then the plane made a sharp left turn following the Green River to the Mineral Bottom airstrip.  The plane landed on a weed covered dirt runway and we had to turn the plane around manually so it would be able to take off.  The rafts had come down from Green River, Utah about a 70 mile trip to meet the group at Mineral Bottom.  After a quick orientation everyone was loaded onto the rafts and the adventure began.  Shortly after we left ,Wayne was pointing out the incredible geology of Canyonlands National Park.  After a deli lunch on a sandbar we hiked to the hill top ruin at Fort Bottom.

Metoposaurus-An amphibian that lived 220 million years ago

Metoposaurus-An amphibian that lived 220 million years ago

On the way up to the ruins we saw fossilized scutes left behind by Metoposaurusan amphibian that lived during the Triassic Period over 220 million years ago.  These amphibians have been measured up to 10 feet in length.  We also saw petrified wood and checked out the old “Outlaw Cabin” in addition to just taking in the incredible view.  Camp was set up at the beach below Fort Bottom and Outlaw tales about Butch Cassidy were spun around the campfire.

 

 

IMG_8521

Fort Bottom Hilltop Ruin

The second day of the river trip started with a geology presentation from Wayne about the younger rock layers of Canyonlands including the Navajo, Wingate, Chinle, and Moenkopi Formations.  We also were able to check out the Geological Map of Canylonlands National Park and get a bering on exactly where we were in the Colorado Plateau.  On the river stops were made at the rincon and abandoned river channel of Anderson Bottom, the Turk’s Head, for looking at ancestral puebloan granaries and checking out the chert knapping sites used by the ancestral puebloans to craft arrow heads and other tools, and Lunch.  Camp was set up just below Horse Canyon which is 37 miles below Mineral Bottom.  During the night we had a big windstorm and enough rain to set up tents for.  You know it is a great trip when everyone is laughing and telling jokes at one in the morning during a 60 mile an hour windstorm with rain in April.

IMG_8605

View Looking Upstream From Above Stovepipe Camp

Our third day on the river trip took us just 8 miles down river to the Stove Pipe trail and hike.  We set up camp early and ate lunch,  then we hiked up the stove pipe trail about 1300 vertical feet and a couple of miles to an incredible view of the Maze and Needles Districts of Canyonlands from the Island in the Sky.  After checking out the landscape we continued to an amazing double arch in the Cedar Mesa Sandstone.  After hiking to the arch we checked out an old burned down Cabin and peered straight down to our camp on the banks of the Green River.  After the hike everyone went for a swim in the River to wash and cool off.  That evening we had a great dinner followed by a night of SMORE cooking perfections.

 

An incredible journey to an amazing destination.

An incredible journey to an amazing destination.

The morning of the 4th day of the river trip we started with a great lecture from Wayne and then headed down to the Green’s Confluence with the might Colorado.  To river runners this is considered the center of the universe, because most river running started on these two rivers.  At the confluence we were able to locate a couple of really cool inscriptions.  One was an inscription from Stanton’s railroad survery in 1889 another was an inscription from the United States Reclamation Service who was looking to build a dam at the confluence in 1914.  Lucky for us neither of these projects ever were completed.  After Lunch we headed down to sign up for our camps for the next few nights in Cataract Canyon.  Lucky for us Brown Betty, which is probably the best camp in Cataract Canyon was open for a layover day.  We signed up for two nights at Brown Betty and one night below the big drop rapids at Gypsum Canyon where we could search for the Paradox Formation.  Wayne gave another great geology lecture about the Paradox Formation and Cataract Canyon.

Learning about Cataract Canyon, Grabens, Salt Valleys, and the Paradox Formation

Learning about Cataract Canyon, Grabens, Salt Valleys, and the Paradox Formation

Day 5 of our river trip was spent hiking into the Doll’s House of the Maze District.  Once again we hiked up about 1300 vertical feet from the river.  From the Doll’s house we had an incredible view of the Island in the Sky and the Needles, but the view in front of us was even more spectacular.  We took a leisurely loop hike through the spires, narrows, and wildflowers of the Doll’s House.  Lunch was spent on a rock overlooking a Graben where the salt left behind by over 60 ocean episodes had flowed into the vacancy of space left by the river cutting Cataract Canyon leading to a huge slump of land sliding into Cataract Canyon and leaving a “surprise valley” below us.  We then hiked back to our fabulous camp and enjoyed a perfect starry night.

Day 6 it was all about Cataract Canyon whitewater rafting.  we ran rapids 2-14 and then stopped at Capsize Rapid to check out the old inscriptions left by the Stanton Expedition and Best Expedition of 1891 that spent 7 days trying to rescue a boat pinned against one of the many rocks in the rapid.   After Capsize we stopped for lunch and then ran in quick succession Ben Hurt, Big Drop 1, Big Drop 2, and Big Drop 3 as well as the remaining rapids.  Camp was set up at Gypsum Canyon and most of the group did a hike up Gypsum where we did find the Paradox Formation.

The last day of the trip was spent motoring through the lower parts of Cataract Canyon. The trip ended at North Wash just past the Dirty Devil.  After unloading the boats everyone flew back to the Moab airport where a shuttle took everyone back to Red Cliff’s Lodge for a Banquet Dinner.  The trip was incredible and the people were some of the best you could ever hope to meet.

Menu

Reservations: 800-253-7328 or 801-261-1789

>