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Posts Tagged ‘Colorado River’

Colorado River Dory and Music Trip–July 5-16, 2015

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Colorado River & Trail Expeditions will be running a Dory and Music trip July 5-16, 2015 through Utah’s Canyonlands.  The trip will start at Loma, Colorado near the Utah/Colorado stateline.  The trip will follow the Colorado River through Ruby, Horsethief, Westwater, and Cataract Canyons before ending at the headwaters of Lake Powell.  The trip will be hosted by boat builder and musician Andy Hutchinson; and famous historian, author, and boat builder Brad Dimock.  This should be the perfect trip for those who have always wanted to experience the Colorado River above the Grand Canyon in the sleek style and feel of a Dory.  In addition to the rapids and river scenery, the schedule should allow for plenty of time for off-river hiking and exploration.  Camp time will be filled with stories, history, music, and campfires.  The trip is priced at $2995.00/person with round trip transportation provided from Green River, UT.  Below is a rough itinerary for the trip.  As of today there are 8 spaces available.

A Land of Rock

A Land of Rock

Day 1:

We will get an early start and drive from Green River, Utah to Loma, Colorado where we will be fitted with life jackets, given a safety orientation, and introduced to the guides. Shortly after we will push off on the mighty Colorado River.  Right away we will be in Horsethief Canyon.  Camp will be set up at Mee Corner.

Day 2:

We will leave Horsethief Canyon and then enter Ruby Canyon.  Camp will be set-up in the Black Rocks section.

Day 3:

Around lunchtime we will say our goodbyes to our Adventure Bound guide and support raft.  The first few miles after lunch will be spent floating through big cottonwood groves and sandstone outcroppings teaming with an array of birds including Bald Eagles.  Then suddenly the Wingate sandstone walls become high and the black rock of the metamorphic complex starts to reach its fingers out of the river.  Westwater Canyon is one of the most beautiful sections of the Colorado River.  After a short hike to the abandoned Miner’s Cabin, and running a few small rapids, camp will be set up near the Little Dolores River.

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Scouting the Big Drops

Day 4:

Today will be one of the most exciting whitewater days of the river trip.  The fun and exciting class III-IV rapids of Westwater Canyon will come one after another.  Some of the bigger rapids include: Funnel Falls, Skull Rapid, and Sock-It-To-Me.  After the river exits Westwater Canyon it will mellow out again and the river banks once again will be filled with large cottonwood groves and sandstone outcroppings.  Camp will be set up near Fish Ford and we will hopefully do a nice hike to a big view.

Day 5:

Today brings us into the upper section of the Moab Daily and past the Cutler Sandstone Fisher Towers.  Views of sandstone spires, pinnacles, and buttes will be framed by the laccolithic La Sal mountains from our camp along the rapids of Onion Creek.

Day 6:

After a nice early start, we will maneuver our way through the last few rapids of the Moab Daily section of the Colorado River.  Sometime before lunchtime a motorized raft will meet up with us and motor us through 30 miles of flat water.  Garbage and recycling will be exchanged for new food and drink.  We will float past the Salt Valley known as Moab, through the Portal, and into Canyonlands National Park.

Dory in Rapids

Dory in Rapids

Day 7:

In the morning we will take a short hike amongst the ruins and pictographs of the Ancestral Puebloan site at Lathrop Canyon.  Then we will get back on the boats and float toward Indian Creek.  Indian Creek offers more opportunities for hiking and ruins as well as a nice camping opportunity.

Day 8:

The river makes a large gooseneck, and at the narrowest part, a short steep hike affords some spectacular views and the opportunity to meet the boats on the other side. Along the hike are ancient petroglyphs.  In the afternoon the Colorado River will meet the Green River.  The confluence of these two rivers is often referred to as the “Center of the Universe” amongst rafters.

Day 9:

A Layover Day!!  Relax and Read, or Hike up to the Dolls House of the Maze District of Canyonlands National Park.  Pack a lunch.  Great Geology!  Great Views!  Great Hike!

Dories lined up at camp

Dories lined up at camp

Day 10:

Rapids! Today we will run the first 20 rapids of Cataract Canyon.  The rapids will start small and gradually increase in size.  Camp will be set up at the top of the famous Big Drop Rapids.

Day 11:

The Biggest Rapids of the Trip!  Today we will run the series of rapids known as the Big Drops.  The Big Drops in Cataract Canyon are always very technical and at high water are the biggest rapids in North America.  In July they should be a little more tame, but still very exciting.  After the Big Drops, we will see the effects of a 15-year prolonged drought, as some rapids that have been buried under the water of Lake Powell for the last 30 years have re-emerged recently.  These include a long rocky rapid at the head of Waterhole Canyon.  In the afternoon we may have time to hike into Dark Canyon.

Day 12:

After an early start, we will reflect on our incredible journey over the past 12 days.  The trip will end at North Wash and transportation will be provided back to Green River.

Brad Dimock author of "Sunk WIth Out a Sound" and "The Doing of the Thing"

Brad Dimock author of “Sunk With Out a Sound” and “The Doing of the Thing”

Grand Canyon Rafting FAQs

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Thinking about rafting the Grand Canyon for the first time?  It’s hard to know what to expect on a river trip, especially if you haven’t been before.  We get a lot of e-mails and calls with general questions about our rafting trips.  In an effort to help you better understand rafting the Grand Canyon with CRATE, here is a short FAQ list to answer some questions you may have.

camp near little coloradoQ- What is the best time of year to raft the Grand Canyon?
A- We have scheduled our expeditions during the times of year that we think are most appropriate and enjoyable. It doesn’t really matter when you go. However, as a general rule of thumb, you can think of April and May as the most moderate months as far as temperatures go. It can be kind of chilly on the river, especially when you are splashed in the rapids, but it’s usually perfect for long off-river hikes. This is also the best time to see wildflowers in bloom. June and July are warm and dry, perfect for running rapids and playing in side streams, waterfalls, and natural pools. In August, thunder showers cool things off a bit, and the rain causes cactus and other desert plants to bloom. Early-to-mid September, like the spring months, offers cooler temperatures and ideal weather for off-river trekking.

Q- What is your age restriction for the Grand Canyon?
A- 12 Years and older.

Q- Is there 1-Day rafting available in the Grand Canyon?
A- Access in and out of the Grand Canyon is very limited.  There is a company that provides 1/2 and full day calm water float trips from the Glen Canyon Dam to Lees Ferry (Colorado River Discovery).  They will take 4 years and older.  The shortest rafting trip with CRATE is our Ranch and Raft trip which is 3 days.

Q- Do I really need to bring a rain suit in July?
A- YES!  We highly recommend bringing a rain jacket, at least.  The Colorado River water temperature stays around 50 degrees F year round.  Running rapids in the morning can be cold if the sun hasn’t come up over the Canyon walls. 

Q- What kind of footwear should I bring?
A- Good quality, comfortable footwear.  We recommend one pair of river sandals that can be worn on the raft and also on off river hiking excursions (Chaco, Teva, Keen).  We also recommend one pair of athletic shoes as a backup or an alternative hiking shoe.  Hiking boots are optional, but recommended if you need the foot-ankle support.

Q- How experienced are your guides?
A- Most of our guides develop their expertise through an in-house training program that gives them an opportunity to learn everything about the river business from the bottom up. They participate in numerous training trips as helpers, or “swampers,” and must be able to repair rafts, motors and other equipments before they start operating their own rafts with customers on board. This usually requires two seasons. Most of our guides have a minimum of 3-5 years’ experience. Our veteran guides have been with us from 10-20 years.

Q- What is your operating season?
A- Early April through late September.

Q- How many people per boat?
A-
Our 37 foot motorized “S” rigs can accommodate 12-14 passengers plus 2 guides.  Our 18 foot row rigs can accommodate 3-4 passengers plus 1 guide.  Our paddle raft holds 6-8 paddlers plus 1 guide.

Q- What if I have a group?
A- We gladly welcome groups.  12 people qualify for our 10% Group Discount.  If you are interested in chartering a trip, please contact us.

Q- How far in advance do I need to book?
A- 
Most people book a year in advance.  Our April and May trips tend to fill up faster than our later summer trips.  However, there are usually some last minute cancellations.  Just call or e-mail our office to check availability.  Final payment is generally due 60 days prior to the trip departure date.

Q- Can I book a trip online?
A- We like to deal with our clients directly and get to know them.  Feel free to call us or e-mail us anytime with questions or to sign up for a trip.

Q- Why should we choose your company?
A- If you appreciate personal service and enjoy being treated more like a “friend” than a “client,” you will probably like going with us. From office staff to river crew, we will do everything we can to help you plan, prepare and enjoy your time on the river. Our guides are the best! In addition to their training and experience, they are kind and friendly and enthusiastic. You should also consider we do not overcrowd our trips or our rafts. Our equipment is in excellent condition. We love what we do!

Q- What is your menu like?
A- Delicious Dutch-oven dinners, sandwich bar lunches, and hearty camp breakfasts are provided throughout the river trip. We think our menu will satisfy everyone, from those who are watching calories and cholesterol to those who want to splurge on the richest desserts and the biggest steaks! With ample quantites of fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and pasta, non-meat eaters also have a variety of good foods from which to choose. Hot beverages such as coffee, tea, and cocoa are served in camp. Assorted non-alcoholic cold drinks are available throughout the day. We do not provide alcoholic beverages, but adult guests may bring small amounts of beer, wine, or liquor for their personal use.

Q- What about bathing and bathroom facilities?
A- It is okay to bathe and/or wash in the river, providing you use biodegradable soap and shampoo. Hand washing devices are set up in every camp. We carry clean, easy-to-use portable toilet facilities with us. They are set up in each camp and concealed in large, roomy tents for privacy.

Q- What is a typical day like on the river?
A- Our guides will wake you early in the morning with a call for “coffee.”  When you hear the call, it means time to come to the kitchen area.  After eating your breakfast, you will have a chance to pack your personal camping gear.  The guides will break-down the kitchen and start to load the rafts.  You may carry your gear to the beach area in front of the boats and when the guides have secured the deck, they will ask your your helping loading personal dry bags.  We stop during the day of lunch, usually on a sandy beach along the bank of the river.  After a full day or rafting and hiking, we will find a place to set up camp.  We ask everyone who is able to help the crew unload the boats to form a line and pass gear on the to the beach.  Guides will set up the kitchen and community camping gear while individuals set up their personal area.  Soon after making camp, the guides will begin to cook dinner.  This is often a good time to write in your journal, read a book, or take a refreshing bath or “power nap.”

For more FAQs: http://www.crateinc.com/why-crate

To make a reservation or check availiability please call or e-mail us at:
1-800-253-7328 / crate@crateinc.com
www.crateinc.com

 

Studying Elusive Mountain Lions at Grand Canyon

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This article was recently published in the Grand Canyon Association magazine, “Canyon Views,” Vol. 20, No. 2, Spring 2013.

Although you can see many wildlife species at Grand Canyon, from small Abert’s squirrels to plentiful elk, some are more elusive. With patience and a trained eye you might catch a glimpse of a bighorn sheep scrambling up a cliff or a condor flying overhead. It’s rare to see a mountain lion, however. And that’s one of the reasons park wildlife biologist Brandon Holton finds them so intriguing.

“I love getting into the mind of a mountain lion and trying to figure out why are they going where they go,” he says. “It’s almost like being a CSI investigator.”

The mountain lion (Puma concolor), also known as the puma, cougar, panther or catamount, is a large cat whose habitat ranges from the Canadian Yukon to the Southern Andes of South America. Up until 10 years ago, little was known about these animals at Grand Canyon. Then, in 2003, the National Park Service began a biological study of mountain lions to uncover their habitat and behavior, how they impact park resources and whether they are a danger to humans. In 2008, Brandon took over the program. Since then, he and his team have put GPS collars on 32 cats – 22 on the South Rim and 10 on the North Rim – and typically track five animals at a time.

The most revealing places to study mountain lions are where they take down and feed on their prey – locations called kill sites. “It’s interesting to do kill site investigations and to recreate them,” says Brandon. “Why are they using a certain habitat? Where did they stalk the animal? Where was the ambush, and what was the struggle? I see all different types of burials, drags and day beds.”

Typically, males eat as quickly as possible and move on, spending one to five days at a site, depending on the season. Females will stay on longer, generally until the carcass is picked clean, especially when they are caring for older cubs. And yet one time. Brandon tracked a younger male who killed a bull elk and sat on it for 20 days. He had observed this mountain lion as a younger cat, and over time watched as the cat got bigger and bigger.

“When he was about three and a half, I walked in on him. He was 30 feet from me, and he had just gotten off a kill. He had to have known I was there, but he couldn’t have cared less. He just rolled onto his back, and his stomach was just so distended. This is not typical behavior when humans are nearby.”

Another cat, a female that was collared in July 2011, also exhibited atypical behavior. She dropped into the inner canyon in November and didn’t come out until April. She was mainly feeding on bighorn sheep and some mule deer. The female crossed the river four different times, always just below Turquoise Rapid. “Thus far, almost all of the collared cats remained on the rim year-around and rarely visited the deep inner canyon,” says Brandon, “but there could be more occurrences like this that we’re not tracking.” This uncommon behavior is one of the reasons the park is studying these powerful and solitary animals.

Mountain lions in Grand Canyon, especially males, typically have a very broad home range – about 150 square miles. Grand Canyon lion studies are run jointly between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Grand Canyon National Park Service (NPS) to increase sample sizes, distribute study costs and allow researchers to look at mountain lion ecology on a larger landscape scale. The lions roam far beyond the park’s borders; almost every collared mountain lion has used surrounding U.S. Forest Service land as much as, if not more than, the park itself. For example, two subadult males in the study dispersed south from Grand Canyon to the Flagstaff area.

Humans have virtually no reason to fear mountain lions. These cats avoid humans because they don’t see us as prey. We, however, can be very dangerous to them: 60 percent of collared mountain lion deaths are are due to hunting outside the park, and the second most common cause of death is being hit by a car, especially on East Rim Drive. Mountain lions cross the road, which parallels the rim, to set up their beds for the day. Their deaths could be greatly reduced if only people watched for animals and used caution when driving in the park.

In recent years, the joint NPS/USGS research program has begun to study predator-prey relationships, particularly interactions between desert bighorn sheep and mountain lions. As more is revealed about Grand Canyon’s largest wild predator, the ecosystem as whole can be better understood and protected.

One interesting result of Brandon’s study has been the contrast in behavior between South and North Rim mountain lions. The following data reflects what his team has learned from the mountain lions they have collared.

SOUTH RIM
Prey: 65% elk, 30% mule deer
Age: 2-1/2 years old
Range: South Rim cats rarely go into the inner canyon = 95% of collared cats have stayed on the rim.

NORTH RIM
Prey: 95% mule deer (there are no elk on the North Rim)
Age: 2-6 years old
Range: North Rim cats have gone into the canyon more often than South Rim cats to hunt desert bighorn sheep, especially during winter when the mule deer on the North Rim disperse to lower elevations.

Chicken Salad Recipe

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Over the years, we’ve had many compliments and questions about the meals we prepare on our river trips.  We thought we would share a recipe with those of you who would like to try preparing one of more popular lunches at home.

Chicken Salad Wraps (Serves approx. 5)

– 2-3 Cans (7.5 oz) Canned Chicken- 2 Cups Celery
– 1-2 Tomatoes
– 1 Cucumber
– 1 Red Onion
– 2 Cups Red Grapes
– 1 Cup Whole Cashews
– 1 Head of Romaine or Iceberg Lettuce
– Mayonnaise
-1 Package of Tortillas

Open/drain the Canned Chicken and add to a large bowl.  Dice Celery, Tomatoes, Cucumber and Red Onion and add to the bowl.  Shred the Lettuce and add to the bowl.  Add Red Grapes (can be whole or sliced in half) and Cashews.  Add enough Mayonnaise to get the consistency you want and mix all the ingredients together.

Serve in a tortilla and enjoy!

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Cataract Canyon Photography River Trip Hosted by Tom Till

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tomTillSpecial Photography River Trip Hosted by Tom Till, July 29-August 4, 2013

Colorado River Cataract Canyon, Canyonlands National Park

We are excited to announce this special on-river photography workshop with Tom Till.  Tom has lived in Moab, Utah, and has been exploring and photographing the surrounding red rock canyon country for 40 years.  Sharing Tom’s enthusiasm and expertise in his “own backyard,” is a rare opportunity.  The trip is limited to 12 participants to ensure that Tom is able to provide some one-on-one instruction to each person.  Don’t wait too long to make your reservation if you want to photograph Utah’s beautiful Canyonlands with one of the best and nicest photo pros in the business, reserve your place today.

If you have any questions or would like more details about the 2013 Photography Rafting Expeditions hosted by Tom Till, please contact our office at 1-800-253-7328 or crate@crateinc.com.  Additionally, our current brochure includes descriptive information about Cataract Canyon rafting.

About Tom Tom has a degree in education from Iowa State University and was a professional teacher for eight years.  His forty years of exploring the Canyon Country and the world with his camera, and his 32 years as a professional photographer make him uniquely qualified as a workshop instructor and tour leader.  Tom is also an experienced river runner.  He is approachable, eager to share his knowledge, and patient and encouraging with his fellow photographers.  He believes everyone has a unique vision of the world that better photography can reveal.  Proficient with 4×5 medium format, and 35mm cameras, Tom is up-to-date with the latest technology and film and digital cameras.  Visit Tom’s website at www.tomtillphotography.com

Tom’s traveling exhibit of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, sponsored by the UN and U.S. State Department is in its third year of crisscrossing the world.  Tom recently received an award for his work with the Nature Conservancy, the second from that organization he has earned.

THE EXPLORATION OF THE COLORADO RIVER AND ITS CANYONS

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FEATURED BOOK OF THE WEEK:

THE EXPLORATION OF THE COLORADO RIVER AND ITS CANYONS
by J.W. Powell

This book can be purchased at the CRATE BOOKSTORE for $12.95

Complete reprint of “Canyons of the Colorado” 1895 edition, with supplementary map. This was the first published account in book format of Powell’s 1869 discovery journey down the Green and Colorado Rivers. 150 illustrations and photographs. Dover Publications.

Colorado River

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The "Cataract Canyon Coyotes" enjoying the highest water in 25 years on the Colorado River in 2011

2011 Brought the Highest Water in Cataract Canyon since 1984

Colorado River

The Colorado River is probably the most famous river in the world. The river flows 1450 miles starting at the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado and flowing into the Gulf of California between Baja and mainland Mexico. The Colorado River drains 246,000 square miles in parts of seven U.S. states and two Mexican states.

The most famous sections to raft the Colorado River are through the Grand Canyon, Cataract Canyon, and Westwater Canyon. Colorado River & Trail Expeditions offers rafting trips on these sections as well as on the Fisher Towers 1-day stretch near Moab, Utah. Each trip offers a unique rafting experience full of excitement, beauty, and fun.

Grand Canyon Rafting

The Colorado River whitewater rafting trip through the Grand Canyon is probably the most famous stretch of river in the world. The Colorado River travels 277 miles from Lees Ferry to Pearce Ferry in Arizona. In order to cover all 277 miles of the canyon one needs a minimum of 8 days. Partial trips are available to or from Phantom Ranch and Whitmore Wash. The biggest rapids along the Colorado River in this stretch are Crystal, Lava Falls, Hermit, and Granite.

Cataract Canyon Rafting

Cataract Canyon is located in Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah. It is upstream of the Grand Canyon and downstream of Westwater Canyon. The Colorado River joins the Green River right before plunging into Cataract Canyon. Cataract Canyon offers rapids larger than the Grand Canyon at flows above 30,000 cfs and can become awe-inspiring at flows over 60,000 cfs. At lower flows the rapids are much smaller, but still fun. Though exciting, whitewater is just a small part of the experience of rafting the Colorado River in Canyonlands National Park. The sandstone landscape is unlike any other in the world and the mesas, buttes, and graben valleys offers plenty of exploration opportunities. Plan on spending 3-4 days to see this marvelous landscape. The most famous rapids on this stretch are the Big Drops.

Westwater Canyon

Westwater Canyon is located on the Colorado River near the Utah and Colorado border. The trip is short and sweet, covering 17 miles of rapids, sandstone cliffs, and precambrian rocks. Famous rapids along this stretch include Skull, Funnel Falls, and Sock-it-to-Me. This trip can be a destination as an overnight river trip or as part of the Canyon Country experience combining it with hiking, biking, or jeeping in the Moab or Green River, Utah area.

Colorado River Trip Near Moab

This one day stretch is very popular. The Colorado River flows underneath tall sandstone cliffs and over fun rapids. This is great trip for those short on time and is a fun introduction to rafting on the mighty Colorado.

Happy 95th Birthday National Park Service!

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NPS turns 95 Today!

Happy 95th Birthday NPS

Today marks the 95th Birthday of the National Park Service.  The National Park Service Organic Act was signed on August 25, 1916 by Woodrow Wilson establishing the National Park Service as an agency of the United States Department of the Interior.  The act was sponsored by Representative William Kent (I) of California and Senator Reed Smoot (R) of Utah. The first appointed NPS director was Stephen Mather, who took on the responsibility of supervising and maintaining all designated national parks, battlefields, historic places, and monuments.  Prior to the signing of the NPS Organic Act National Parks and Monuments were managed locally, or by the US Army with varying degrees of success.  The act gave us the eloquent and famous passage on the duty of the newly formed NPS:

“… to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.”

Colorado River and Trail Expeditions is very thankful for the foresight of the individuals and organizations that fought to protect wild places and preserve open spaces.  We operate in three National Parks in the United States.  We offer whitewater rafting tours in Grand Canyon, Canyonlands, and Glacier Bay.  We also operate in Kluane National Park and Tatshenshini-Alsek Provincial Park in Canada.

Our Grand Canyon whitewater rafting trips travel all 278 miles along the Colorado River through the heart of Grand Canyon National Park.  The Grand Canyon did not become a National Park until 1919 after a long fight to protect it.

Our Cataract Canyon rafting trips travel through the heart of Canyonlands National Park where the mighty Green and Colorado Rivers come together, separating Canyonlands into three distinct areas: The Maze, The Needles, and The Island in the Sky.  Whitewater bigger than the Grand Canyon abounds in the spring.  When the water drops and the temperatures cool down in the fall we do incredible fall hiking and rafting tours to see the sights of the hard to get to “martian landscape.”

Our Alaska rafting trips are the best way to see Kluane, Tatshenshini-Alsek, and Glacier Bay National Parks.  The land is true wilderness where wolverines, bears, moose, and wolves rule the landscape.  These rafting tours give plenty of time to see the sites and enjoy the experience of hiking on Walker Glacier and watching icebergs break off into Alsek Lake.

The National Parks were the United State’s best idea, and we are proud and lucky to operate our business in them.  We wish the National Park Service a happy 95th birthday.

 

Why is the Little Colorado River Turquoise Blue?

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Little Colorado River

Why is the Little Colorado River Blue?

When you pour a glass of ice cold water out of one of our 7-Gallon Orange Gott Coolers the water may appear colorless, but water is actually a faint blue color. Water’s natural blue color is easy to see when one looks at deep bodies of water such as the oceans, and deep mountain lakes such as Lake Tahoe. The color of water does not come from light scattering(why the sky is blue) nor dissolved elements and compounds(such as copper). Water absorbs the red end of the visible spectrum, thus when we look at water we see the complementary color of orange which is blue. When one observes dark blue water they are looking at deep water that has absorbed most of the orange. When one looks at turquoise colored water they are looking at water that has only absorbed a little of the orange. Pure water actually derives its color from, and is the only known example of natural color caused by vibrational transitions. Vibrational transitions have to do with the molecular form of water.

There are other factors that can change the color of pure water. For example the Colorado River when it flows out the bottom of Glen Canyon Dam is green in color due to green algae in the river, and the natural color of the Colorado River is a light tan color due to suspended brownish colored silt. Small particles in rivers can scatter, absorb, and reflect light. In the case of the Little Colorado River and Havasu Creek, they are very rich in lime due to to the sedimentary rock layers they have cut through. In addition to the lime scattering light in these streams, the calcium carbonate in the lime coats the bottom of these waters with a white bottom. The white light reflected off objects can be seen when no part of the light spectrum is reflected significantly more than any other color. Thus in swimming pools, the Little Colorado River, and Havasu Creek, the deeper the water the darker the blue color, due to more orange absorption of the sunlight from the water and the white bottom reflecting all colors equally.

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