Colorado River Flows

River Flow is an important things to know before going on a river trip.  In 2014 the Grand Canyon has seen some relatively low flows.  April and May had fluctuations between 5,500 cfs and 11,000 cfs, with the weekends, especially Sunday releases being much lower.  This is because the river is regulated by Glen Canyon Dam which backs up Lake Powell.  These lower flows make some rapids bigger, and some rapids smaller, but all of the rapids become rockier and more technical.  Above Lake Powell the Colorado and Green have gone up and down all spring.  The mountains have a nice amount of snow, but the temperatures have gotten hot and then suddenly cooled off and the flow through Cataract Canyon has taken on the appearance of a Sin wave.  For those interested in learning the flows of the river their are a few different ways.

#1.  Check out the Colorado River Basin Forecast Center River Map:  http://www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/gmap/gmapbeta.php?interface=river another nice feature about this site is you can click on the PEAK FLOW FORECAST LIST and one can see what the most recent Peak Flow forecast is for a particular section of river.  For instance on May 19, 2014 Cataract Canyon was given a 50% chance of peaking at 60,000 cfs sometime in 2014.

#2.  Call 1-801-539-1311.  This phone number goes to a recorded message which tells the river flows for a particular day.  This message is updated daily.

#3.  Buy or download one of the river flow apps on the itunes store.

#4.  For Grand Canyon, where the water is regulated, be sure to check out the Bureau of Reclamation Current Dam Flow Report for Glen Canyon Dam.

High water means a lot of excitement for rafters in Cataract Canyon.  Cataract Canyon is generally considered the biggest whitewater in North America at flows above 50,000 cfs so it looks like 2014 is going to be a big water year.

 

Canyonlands by John Wesley Powell

A Land of Rock

A Land of Rock-Toni Kaus

As we all know JW Powell had a way with words and his descriptions of the Grand Canyon have rarely been equalled.  Having just finished a Spring rafting trip in Canyonlands National Park we had to share Powell’s diary entry from July 17, 1869.  This entry includes the last 40 miles of the Green River’s course before joining the Grand, forming the mighty Colorado River, and plunging into the perils of Cataract Canyon.  The Colorado Plateau is such a unique place and if you have never seen Canyonlands National Park it is a place to put on your list.  The below entry will inspire your imagination:

-Wayne Ranney Photo

-Wayne Ranney Photo

July 17, 1869. – The line which separates Labyrinth Canyon from the one below is but a line, and at once, this morning, we enter another canyon. The water fills the entire channel, so that nowhere is there room to land. The walls are low, but vertical, and as we proceed they gradually increase in altitude. Running a couple of miles, the river changes its course many degrees toward the east. Just here a little stream comes in on the right and the wall is broken down; so we land and go out to take a view of the surrounding country. We are now down among the buttes, and in a region the surface of which is naked, solid rock – a beautiful red sandstone, forming a smooth, undulating pavement. The Indians call this the Toom’pin Tuweap’, or “Rock Land,” and sometimes the Toom’pin wunear^1 Tuweap’, or “Land of Standing Rock.”

Off to the south we see a butte in the form of a fallen cross. It is several miles away, but it presents no inconspicuous figure on the landscape and must be many hundreds of feet high, probably more than 2,000. We note its position on our map and name it “The Butte of the Cross.”

We continue our journey. In many places the walls, which rise from the water’s edge, are overhanging on either side. The stream is still quiet, and we glide along through a strange, weird, grand region. The landscape everywhere, away from the river, is of rock – cliffs of rock, tables of rock, plateaus of rock, terraces of rock, crags of rock – ten thousand strangely carved forms; rocks everywhere, and no vegetation, no soil, no sand. In long, gentle curves the river winds about these rocks.

When thinking of these rocks one must not conceive of piles of boulders or heaps of fragments, but of a whole land of naked rock, with giant forms carved on it: cathedral-shaped buttes, towering hundreds or thousands of feet, cliffs that cannot be scaled, and canyon walls that shrink the river into insignificance, with vast, hollow domes and tall pinnacles and shafts set on the verge overhead; and all highly colored – buff, gray, red, brown, and chocolate – never lichened, never moss-covered, but bare, and often polished.

We pass a place where two bends of the river come together, an intervening rock having been worn away and a new channel formed across. The old channel ran in a great circle around to the right, by what was once a circular peninsula, then an island; then the water left the old channel entirely and passed through the cut, and the old bed of the river is dry. So the great circular rock stands by itself, with precipitous walls all about it, and we find but one place where it can be scaled. Looking from its summit, a long stretch of river is seen, sweeping close to the overhanging cliffs on the right, but having a little meadow between it and the wall on the left. The curve is very gentle and regular. We name this Bonita Bend.

And just here we climb out once more, to take another bearing on The Butte of the Cross. Reaching an eminence from which we can overlook the landscape, we are surprised to find that our butte, with its wonderful form, is indeed two buttes, one so standing in front of the other that from our last point of view it gave the appearance of a cross.

A few miles below Bonita Bend we go out again a mile or two among the rocks, toward the Orange Cliffs, passing over terraces paved with jasper. The cliffs are not far away and we soon reach them, and wander in some deep, painted alcoves which attracted our attention from the river; then we return to our boats.

Late in the afternoon the water becomes swift and our boats make great speed.. An hour of this rapid running brings us to the junction of the Grand and Green, the foot of Stillwater Canyon, as we have named it. These streams-unite in solemn depths, more than 1,200 feet below the general surface of the country. The walls of the lower end of Stillwater Canyon are very beautifully curved, as the river sweeps in its meandering course. The lower end of the canyon through which the Grand comes down is also regular, but much more direct, and we look up this stream and out into the country beyond and obtain glimpses of snow-clad peaks, the summits of a group of mountains known as the Sierra La Sal. Down the Colorado the canyon walls are much broken.

We row around into the Grand and camp on its northwest bank; and here we propose to stay several days, for the purpose of determining the latitude and longitude and the altitude of the walls. Much of the night is spent in making observations with the sextant.

Looking over the Green-Wayne Ranney

 

Got Milkweed?

Got_Milkweed_thumbThe monarch butterfly migration is one of nature’s most wondrous events. Millions of monarchs travel from as far north as Canada to gather each winter in a forested mountain range of Michoacan, Mexico, now a World Biosphere Reserve. Sadly, without milkweed to eat along the route, the incredible long-distance monarch migration is doomed. You can help the monarchs by planting milkweed this spring. It’s a fun and simple way to preserve an amazing migration and beautify your yard!

Over the years, at the Colorado River & Trail Expeditions’ office in Salt Lake City, Utah, we’ve seen a lot of monarch butterflies pass through our yard. We have a wild crop of milkweed that blooms each year and then turns into silver filaments of “cotton” that drift away on the breeze. When we consider how far these dainty monarchs fly on their journeys between Canada and Mexico, we consider their stopover in our yard as a gift. It’s a pleasure to watch them through the window and as we go about our work. With our first river trip launching today, it’s officially “spring,” and time to check the milkweed and make sure it’ getting ready to bloom!

Portions of this article was reprinted from Wild Earth Guardians, http://www.wildearthguardians.org/site/PageServer#.Uzr2vVcVBr8. (highlight and right click on this link to visit the web page).

 

Celebrating Valentine Day with Stories of River Romance

The idea of starting a river rafting business was born in the hearts of Vicki Woodruff and Dave Mackay after they met on a Grand Canyon river trip in 1968. Vicki and her friend, Lucy, hiked down the Kaibab Trail on the morning of August 10, 1968, to join a rafting expedition down the Colorado River. It was something totally new and adventurous for the two LA girls who worked together at Los Angeles International Airport. When they arrived at the boat beach near Phantom Ranch, they were met by the Trip Leader, Dave Mackay, and were soon on their way down the river!

Vicki’s life was never the same again. She fell in love with the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River. Her journal entries tell about “the brightness of the stars at night,” and the “breathtaking scenery.” It was a “magical, mystical experience.” Each new day was an “exciting adventure of discovering beautiful places hidden away in narrow canyons” and “secret grottoes.” She and Dave got to know each other casually during the course of the trip, and she learned that he lived in Salt Lake City when he wasn’t running rivers, and that he was a student at the University of Utah. She told him she would give him a call when she was in Utah over the upcoming Christmas holidays and maybe they could get together for lunch or something.

Vicki Woodruff hiking down the Kaibab Trail to join the river trip Aug. 10, 1968.  Dave Mackay running the boat in the Grand Canyon Aug. 13, 1968.

Vicki Woodruff hiking down the Kaibab Trail to join the river trip Aug. 10, 1968. Dave Mackay running the boat in the Grand Canyon Aug. 13, 1968.

The Christmas get-together led to a long-distance”affair of the heart,” and Dave seemed to appreciate Vicki’s interest in all things Grand Canyon and Colorado River. He sent articles, suggestions of books to read, and told her river stories when they talked on the telephone. The following summer, Dave invited Vicki to go on a Grand Canyon trip and help out. Happily, she agreed and got the time off work so she could go early and help get the trip ready and then stay after to help clean up. To tell the truth, she was clueless in every way. She packed ALL of the canned goods in one big box so it weighed about a thousand pounds! The other guides who worked with Dave probably thought, “oh boy, here we go, can’t expect much from this girl!” But, they put up with her and she did better as the trip went on. Dave started telling her of his dream to start his own company. By the end of the trip, they were pretty sure they were met to run rivers together forever! And, it’s almost been that long! Forty-plus years since they ran the first Colorado River & Trail Expeditions trip in 1971. Vicki and Dave still run the company and show up for work every day. According to Vicki, “there’s never been a boring day! We still love what we do, and we still dream of our days and nights on the river.”

On one of CRATE’s early trips, Vicki’s sister, Iris, came along with her four kids. Daughter Holly, then 17, met Russell Reeder, who was a crew member on the trip. It was “love at first sight,” and it wasn’t long before they got married. They recently celebrated their 41st wedding anniversary, so they are almost as “old” as CRATE! Holly and Russell’s son, Zak Reeder, became a CRATE guide right out of high school and worked 15 years. Even though he now has a “real” job, Zak comes back to run trips for us every now and then.

Over the years, running rivers and canyoneering have also played an important roll in the lives of CRATE guides. Even when they “retire” or “grow up” and get “real” jobs, they can’t seem to get the river water out of their veins. Take for instance, former guide Abel Nelson, who met his wife, Erin, on a Grand Canyon trip in 1990.Abel and Erin Marriage Announcement Picture Abel and Erin Marriage AnnouncementAnd then, there’s Laurel Worden and Shawn Rohlf who worked a good many years at CRATE before settling down and starting a family. As a committed couple, they didn’t see a reason to “formalize” their marriage until this past summer, when they “got hitched in the ditch.”  (The bottom of the Grand Canyon on a river trip.) They couldn’t have chosen a more beautiful or romantic cathedral for their ceremony. Their “vehicle” was appropriately decorated, labeling them “Just Married.”  And the whole thing was sealed with a kiss at sunset.Laurel and Shawn Wedding Ceremony_DSC_0083Laurel and Shawn GC River Wedding Laurel and Shwan Sunset_DSC_0128Some CRATE “couples” actually met each other while working at CRATE. According to the gossip of the day, when Ashley Knight showed up at the Green River warehouse to start her guiding career, all of the young and single boatmen were “smitten.” Jeff Cole was the lucky guide who stole her heart. After their marriage, they settled down to “normal” life in Oregon and are now the proud parents of baby Ruby (could she be named after Ruby Rapid in the Grand Canyon??)

Ashley Knight (center front) and Jeff Cole (right) on the river with Ariana, Kimo and Adam Teel.

Ashley Knight (center front) and Jeff Cole (right) on the river with fellow guides Ariana Brechtel, Kimo Nelson and Adam Teel.  June 2000.

Jeff and Ashley Cole with baby Ruby, Christmas 2013.

Jeff and Ashley Cole with baby Ruby, Christmas 2013.

 John Toner and Kristen Sorenson met each other while working at CRATE. Kristen is the CRATE office manager and John is our senior-most guide. When John realized she was the best swamper he’d ever had, he started sending her flowers. That will melt a girl’s heart, for sure. They were married in Fredonia, Arizona, “the center of the universe” (according to John) and the location of of CRATE’s Grand Canyon headquarters.  John knew Kristen was a keeper when she suggested they celebrate their wedding night in his sheepcamp cabin.

Kristen and John Formal Wedding Picture J and K Kristen and John Honeymoon SuiteAlthough Annie and Chris Parks didn’t exactly meet while working at CRATE, they did meet on the river when Annie Kester was working for another outfitter. We were all happy when she joined the CRATE Crew the next summer. Annie and Chris logged a lot of hardworking years at CRATE while they both finished college and Chris finally got a “real” job as a mechanical engineer. They were married among fields of wildflowers in a remote area near Haines, Alaska, home of Chris’ parents and headquarters of CRATE North.

The Wedding Ceremony of Annie Kester and Chris Parks

The Wedding Ceremony of Annie Kester and Chris Parks

Annie and Chris Parks!

Annie and Chris Parks!

Bill Trevithick was one of the “initial” guides at CRATE when the company was starting out. He taught several generations of CRATE youngsters how to work hard and run a boat safely down the river. Along the way,he met Sue on the river and they began a long-term friendship that grew into a serious relationship and finally (!) to a happy marriage.

Bill and Sue on a Grand Canyon side hike in 2006.

Bill and Sue on a Grand Canyon side hike in 2006.

Bill and Sue Wedding

Mr. and Mrs. Trevithick

Running the river is a big thing in the life a guide. It becomes a part of his or her identity, and most guides never quite give it up. Mike Sneed wanted to share the river trip experience with his fiance, Leslie, before they tied the knot. It’s always a good idea to let a girl or guy know before they marry you, that they will have to share you with the river.

Mike and Leslie on a CRATE trip through the Grand Canyon. Yep! She liked it!

Mike and Leslie on a CRATE trip through the Grand Canyon. Yep! She liked it!

Emile Eckart worked as a CRATE guide until he decided upon a career in the United States Air Force. He came back to swamp trips when he was on leave, and when he met Meredith, he wanted to show her the Colorado River and the Grand Canyon before they formally wed. While on the river trip in August 2013, they were “married” at Deer Creek Falls by the trip leader, “Captain Mackay.” In December, Emile and Meredith followed up with a more formal ceremony at the El Tovar Hotel on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

The Deer Creek Falls ceremony in Aug. 2013

The Deer Creek Falls ceremony in Aug. 2013

The "formal" wedding on the South Rim of Grand Canyon.

The “formal” wedding on the South Rim of Grand Canyon.

Walker Mackay didn’t meet Mindy on the river, but he knew she was the girl for him when he took her down the Colorado as his swamper in May 2003. They were married a short time later in November 2003 and chose a place on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon to say their vows. Friends, family, and the Crate Crew gathered on the rim above Buck Farm Canyon, where the Colorado River could be seen far below. The marriage was blessed by a California Condor (#22) that came sweeping up from the depths of the canyon and flew over the gathering.

Walker and Mindy Mackay wedding ceremony,

Walker and Mindy Mackay wedding ceremony,

condor couple

The Crate guide family with Walker and Mindy Mackay at their wedding on the rim of the Grand Canyon.

The Crate guide family with Walker and Mindy Mackay at their wedding on the rim of the Grand Canyon. Front L-R: Mike Sneed, Mary Allen, Mikenna Clokey, Latimer Smith,John Toner, Ashley Knight Cole. Back L-R: Zak Reeder, Shawn Rohlf, Loren Sorenson, Mindy Heyborne Mackay, Walker Mackay, Marc Smith, Kimo Nelson, Jeff Cole, Chris Parks, Annie Kester, Sybrena Smith, Mel Kirkland, and Kristen Sorenson.

It’s fitting that we conclude this blog post with a note about the most recent CRATE Romance.  Bonnie Mackay, daughter of Vicki and Dave and sister to Walker, is also a river running gal who met her fiance, Adam Hiscock, in a chance encounter at Deer Creek Falls while on a Grand Canyon rafting trip. Bonnie was working a CRATE trip and Adam was swamping on a trip with Grand Canyon Expeditions. There must be magic at Deer Creek to bring them together at that particular place and time. Now they are engaged to be married in October!

Bonnie and Adam jumping for joy as they announce their forthcoming wedding.

Bonnie and Adam jumping for joy as they announce their forthcoming wedding.

As long as there are rivers to run and people who love rivers, the romance will continue. Thirty years after his adventurous journey down the Green and Colorado Rivers with Major John Wesley Powell in 1871 (Powell’s second trip), Frederick Dellenbaugh wrote a book titled “The Romance of the Colorado River.”  In the preface he wrote, “I shall never cease to feel grateful. It gave me one of the unique experiences of my life. Now, these thirty years after, I review that experience with satisfaction and pleasure, recalling, with deep affection the kind and generous companions of that wild and memorable journey.”

 

 

 

 

 

Via Magazine Highlights Green River

Via, the magazine of AAA recently did a rafting trip with Colorado River and Trail Expeditions on the 1-day section of Gray Canyon.  The river trip was in conjunction with a weekender article about heading to Green River, Utah and exploring the area.  Other attractions listed in the article included the “Good Water Rim Trial”, “Crystal Geyser”, the “John Wesley Powell River History Museum,” and “Goblin Valley State Park.”

The trip leader on the trip was Alex Jensen and is quoted in the article calling Green River and Gray Canyon “a special place that no one knows about.”  We think Alex’s description of the area is right on.  Green River is a special place that is often less crowded and overlooked due to the popularity of nearby Moab.  The area has a remote beauty to it and the Green River 1-day section is as good of a river trip as the Colorado River 1-Day section above Moab.

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions generally meets our guests in Green River, Utah for their trips on the Green River as well as many of our Westwater Canyon river trips on the Colorado River.

Photo Contest will end at the end of November

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions has been running a photo contest this entire year.  The photo contest has three categories: people, scenery, and river.  The winners of the photo contest are chosen based upon their popularity on social media.  The winner of each category will receive a multi-day rafting expedition on through one of Utah’s Desolation, Cataract, or Westwater Canyons.  The Grand Prize winner will receive a river rafting trip through the Grand Canyon in 2014 with acclaimed photographer Tom Till.

The contest will end at midnight on November 30, 2013 and the winners will be announced shortly after.  If you have a photo in the contest be sure to promote your chances of winning by getting everyone you know to vote for your photo.  If you don’t have any photos in the contest make sure to go to the Colorado River & Trail Expeditions website and browse the incredible artwork on display and be sure to vote for your favorites.

Backbend by Marsha Gale

Backbend by Marsha Gale

Fall Grand Canyon Rafting Project-Painting Side Tubes

After the Grand Canyon rafting season ends it is time to start preparing for next April.  One of the projects that we undertake is the maintenance on our side tubes.  This entails fixing any problems and painting the tubes.  We do this work In Fredonia, AZ aka the “Center of the Universe.”

fall rafting projects

The Side Tubes for Grand Canyon Rafting

The first step is to take the tubes out of the warehouse and inflate them outside of our building.  Once the tubes are inflated we check to see if any of the tubes are leaking air or need rubber work.  Then we fix any and all problems by sanding and glueing patches back onto the tubes.  It is amazing how well these tubes hold up.  They are built incredibly well.  Most of our sidetubes were built by the Uniroyal Tire company.  The biggest problem this year seemed to be the grommet patch on the front of the nose of the tube that we lace to our raft and use as a step for our whitewater rafting guests.  Some of the grommets had been pulled out by the incredible force that is placed on these grommets as large waves hit and try to separate the sidetube from the raft.

After the patching and glueing was done it was time to start sanding the old loose paint off of the tubes.  This is a time consuming task but sometimes it is nice to do a project that you don’t have to think about too much and can just let your mind wander.  Once the tubes are  sanded down we have to mask them so we don’t get paint on the places we don’t want.  Then it is time for the painting.  This is the best part of the project.

Painting the side tubes goes quickly and it is great to see how good the tubes look.

The South Rim and The Power House Building

The last couple of days we have been at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon for our annual Grand Canyon National Park Concession meetings.  It was good to see all of our fellow river outfitters and National Park personnel.  Time was spent reviewing our past season and what to expect for next year.  We always feel lucky to travel to the South Rim and peer down into the abyss of the Grand Canyon.  It is a spiritual experience and it reminds us of the exciting and fun times rafting along the Colorado River.

At the head of the Bright Angel Trail there is a new, very nice area complete with bathrooms to wait for fellow hikers.  The Kolb studio was showcasing some amazing paintings of the Grand Canyon many of which were for sale.  If you get to the rim definitely check out the artwork on display.  Other highlights included waking up to dusting of light snow and running along the rim of the Grand Canyon along the “Trail of Time.”

Another thing we got to check out was the “Power House” building.  There is talk to take this incredible old building, which used two Fairbanks-Morse continuous-duty Type D Diesel generators to supply power to the South Rim, and transform it into a museum for art or historic boats of the Grand Canyon.  The building has a lot of character with high ceilings and lots of windows.  The generators are still there as well as the power switches with their original labels:  Indian Garden Pump; El Tovar; Fire Pump; Bright Angel Lights and Power; USNPS; Train Yard; Turbine Cooling Tower; Power House.  On the other side of the building is the old Ice House where ice was made to supply the lodges and restaurants.  It will be exciting to see what becomes of the Power House over the next couple of years.

 

 

 

Paddling Strokes for Beginners [Infographic]

Paddling Strokes Infographic by CRATEINCC.R.A.T.E., Colorado River and Trail Expeditions presents a wonderful Infographic titled ‘Paddling Strokes for Beginners’. It has been created to outline the basics of paddling a raft. It adumbrates the 6 common paddle strokes a rafter must be efficient at.

The Infographic reveals:

  • Names and visual guide of the different types of stokes
  • The effect of each stroke while rafting
  • ‘How-to’ steps for each stroke

7 Fun Things to do in the Grand Canyon

If you are planning a trip to the Grand Canyon, you may wish to try out the following 7 things to have a memorable and fun-filled Grand Canyon vacation.

California Condor seen while Grand Canyon Rafting

California Condor on a Grand Canyon Rafting Expedition

 

 

  1. Ride a bike. The Grand Canyon has miles of green biking trails and rim side roads that let bikers enjoy stunning views of the Canyon. Biking in the Grand Canyon is full of fun and adventure. Further, if you are short on time, it is indeed a quick way to see the canyon.

 

  1. Try out hiking. Want to experience the enormity of this natural wonder? Do some hiking, even if it’s just a few miles below the surface. As you traverse these mighty trails, you would get to feel the incredible vertical scale of the Grand Canyon. Just ensure that you are physically fit as hiking at such high elevation can be dangerous for people with certain medical conditions.

 

  1. Go white water river rafting. There is no better way to see the canyon. White water river rafting promises the adventure of a lifetime.  One will soon find out that in addition to the rapids there are hundreds of fabulous side canyons with waterfalls, pools, vertical walls, and fascinating geology.

 

  1. Rent a car to hit on all the major highlights of the Canyon in a day. Renting your own car gives you the freedom and flexibility to explore the Canyon at your own speed and convenience. You may take a guided tour if you want. Guided tours are great if you do not know much about the Canyon. By being with someone who knows the place inside out, you can rest assured of a great vacation in the canyon.

 

  1. Take a mule ride if you want to have some fun on your Grand Canyon vacation. Mule rides are usually available at Bright Angel Lodge but you should check if they are available or not. Watching the mules is as much fun as riding on their back. Stop by the mule barn in the Grand Canyon to watch the mules.

 

  1. Do you enjoy camping? Even if you have never tried it before, you can plan a camping excursion in the Grand Canyon. Just make sure to acquire a permit to camp around the Grand Canyon before you set your camp.

 

  1. Visit Hermits Rest, Hopi Point, Mohave Point, Lookout Studio, Kolb Studio, and Hopi House. Though there are many other places to see, these are definitely a must-see places. These places are fun to be at and unique in their own way. Further, you can get some great photographs at these places.

 

Taking your holiday in the Grand Canyon can be a lot of fun. Just make sure that you plan your holiday well in advance and take a lot of great photos. You should come back home with great memories that you would cherish for ever.