Anatomy of the Grand Canyon

Anatomy of the Grand Canyon by W. Kenneth Hamblin

This book can be purchased at the CRATE BOOKSTORE for

$49.95

If you have been looking for an informative geology book with a lot of big colorful photos, then this is the book you want.  The book takes panorama size photos of different locations within the Grand Canyon, and in small text labels the rock layers and names of different features.  With each photo a couple of paragraphs help in explaining what is happening in the photo.  The book includes both photos from the Colorado River and from the rims looking down.  This is a great book for someone who is going to the Grand Canyon for the first time, as well as a river guide who has been down the river over 100 times.  This is a must have book for anyone interested in Geology, rafting the Grand Canyon, hiking the Grand Canyon or exploring the points on the rims.

A Field Guide to the Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon Field Guide

A Must Have For Grand Canyon Rafters

FEATURED BOOK OF THE WEEK

A FIELD GUIDE TO THE GRAND CANYON
by Stephen Whitney, 2nd edition (soft cover)

$19.95

An extremely comprehensive field guide for Grand Canyon rafters that includes birds, wildflowers, cacti, mammals, reptiles and amphibians, butterflies, trees and shrubs, ferns, rocks, and fish. Also includes information on fossils, human artifacts, canyon history, climate, trails and visitor facilities. Illustrated with color photographs. This book can be purchased by following the Grand Canyon Maps and Guides link in Colorado River & Trail Expedition’s online store.

Upset in Upset

Story about Upset Rapid in the Grand Canyon

Amil Quayle's Story About Upset Rapid

FEATURED BOOK OF THE WEEK:

UPSET IN UPSET, a Monograph by Amil Quayle

This memoir is about an experience Amil Quayle had on his 2nd run as a guide through the Grand Canyon in 1966. He was alone with a family of four, a 33-foot surplus pontoon raft, one outboard motor, and no communication equipment other than signaling mirrors and panels. Those were the days when you hardly ever saw other rafting parties, so when disaster struck at Upset Rapid, Quayle had no one but himself and the help of one of the passengers, to get everyone off the river safely. This epic achievement has been a part of the guiding community lore for for more than 40 years, but like most stories that are retold time and time again, some things needed to be set right. Amil recalls the details in a nicely crafted story that will show you what river running was like “in the old days.”

$5.00 + Shipping and Handling (Can be autographed by the author on request.)

You can order this book on our online store. Or just give us a call at (800)253-7328.

“The Cataract of Lodore” a poem by Robert Southey

What Andy Hall and JW Powell Saw in 1869

Green River in Lodore Canyon

When the First Powell Expedition reached the end of Brown’s Park on the Green River they came to a deep canyon with swiftwater and rapids. It reminded Andy Hall of a poem named “The Cataract of Lodore.” John Wesley Powell knew the poem by heart and recited it. The expedition decided to name the canyon after the poem, and the name stuck. The canyon is located on the Green River above Desolation Canyon. The canyon was home to the first real rapids that Powell and his men encountered, and they lost one boat in Disaster Falls. The poem was written in 1820.

The Cataract of Lodore by William Southey(written in 1820)

“How does the water
Come down at Lodore?”
My little boy asked me
Thus, once on a time;
And moreover he tasked me
To tell him in rhyme.
Anon, at the word,
There first came one daughter,
And then came another,
To second and third
The request of their brother,
And to hear how the water
Comes down at Lodore,
With its rush and its roar,
As many a time
They had seen it before.
So I told them in rhyme,
For of rhymes I had store;
And ’twas in my vocation
For their recreation
That so I should sing;
Because I was Laureate
To them and the King.

From its sources which well
In the tarn on the fell;
From its fountains
In the mountains,
Its rills and its gills;
Through moss and through brake,
It runs and it creeps
For a while, till it sleeps
In its own little lake.
And thence at departing,
Awakening and starting,
It runs through the reeds,
And away it proceeds,
Through meadow and glade,
In sun and in shade,
And through the wood-shelter,
Among crags in its flurry,
Helter-skelter,
Hurry-skurry.
Here it comes sparkling,
And there it lies darkling;
Now smoking and frothing
Its tumult and wrath in,
Till, in this rapid race
On which it is bent,
It reaches the place
Of its steep descent.

The cataract strong
Then plunges along,
Striking and raging
As if a war waging
Its caverns and rocks among;
Rising and leaping,
Sinking and creeping,
Swelling and sweeping,
Showering and springing,
Flying and flinging,
Writhing and ringing,
Eddying and whisking,
Spouting and frisking,
Turning and twisting,
Around and around
With endless rebound:
Smiting and fighting,
A sight to delight in;
Confounding, astounding,
Dizzying and deafening the ear with its sound.

Collecting, projecting,
Receding and speeding,
And shocking and rocking,
And darting and parting,
And threading and spreading,
And whizzing and hissing,
And dripping and skipping,
And hitting and splitting,
And shining and twining,
And rattling and battling,
And shaking and quaking,
And pouring and roaring,
And waving and raving,
And tossing and crossing,
And flowing and going,
And running and stunning,
And foaming and roaming,
And dinning and spinning,
And dropping and hopping,
And working and jerking,
And guggling and struggling,
And heaving and cleaving,
And moaning and groaning;

And glittering and frittering,
And gathering and feathering,
And whitening and brightening,
And quivering and shivering,
And hurrying and skurrying,
And thundering and floundering;

Dividing and gliding and sliding,
And falling and brawling and sprawling,
And driving and riving and striving,
And sprinkling and twinkling and wrinkling,
And sounding and bounding and rounding,
And bubbling and troubling and doubling,
And grumbling and rumbling and tumbling,
And clattering and battering and shattering;

Retreating and beating and meeting and sheeting,
Delaying and straying and playing and spraying,
Advancing and prancing and glancing and dancing,
Recoiling, turmoiling and toiling and boiling,
And gleaming and streaming and steaming and beaming,
And rushing and flushing and brushing and gushing,
And flapping and rapping and clapping and slapping,
And curling and whirling and purling and twirling,
And thumping and plumping and bumping and jumping,
And dashing and flashing and splashing and clashing;
And so never ending, but always descending,
Sounds and motions for ever and ever are blending
All at once and all o’er, with a mighty uproar, –
And this way the water comes down at Lodore.

Raft the Green River in 2012

Green River Trip

Green River Rafting in Desolation Canyon

Don’t miss rafting the Green River in 2012. Colorado River and Trail Expeditions is offering great rafting deals on our Desolation Canyon rafting expedition including a “No Child Left Inside” youth rate of $595.00 for kids 8-20 years old. The trip is 5 days long and is all-inclusive with great meals and camping equipment. Some of the highlights of rafting the Green River in Desolation Canyon include 60 fun rapids, do it yourself paddling options, great hikes, lots of archaeological treasures, and beautiful sand beaches. We are also offering great group rates and discounts.

What our September Grand Canyon River Trip Guests Told Us

Dory in Grand Canyon Rapids

Grand Canyon Dory Ride

We finished off our river season with two rowing/paddle hybrid trips. One was a total of 13 days, including an exchange of folks at Phantom Ranch, and Whitmore Wash, before reaching Lake Mead. The other was a charter trip of 12 days to Diamond Creek. The crew was told on both trips multiple times how awesome the trip was and that we should be marketing our use of Cots and having a Dory along.

We have taken Cots on almost all of our Grand Canyon Rafting trips for the past 5 years. We have found them to be a nice addition to trips for a couple of reasons. First off, they get our guests off the ground. This makes for a comfortable nights sleep free of sand. Secondly, they allow for air to pass around our guests for a cooler night sleep during the summer months. Finally, due to Glen Canyon Dam, the beaches of Grand Canyon are shrinking, making it harder each year to find big sand bars to camp on. In 2012, Cots will be available on all of our Grand Canyon Motorized, Non-Motorized, Ranch & Raft, and Paddle Trips. We have had a lot of guests ask about our Cots. They are made by Roll-a-Cot. We use the wide model on our rafting expeditions. We also provide cots on all of our Cataract Canyon rafting expeditions. If you are joining us on a Desolation Canyon or Westwater Canyon rafting expedition, just ask, and we will provide a cot for you.

Cots on Grand Canyon Rafting Trip

Sunset at the Ledges

The second thing that both trips commented on was how great it was to have along a Dory. Both of our September rafting trips included oar rafts, paddle rafts, and a Dory. The Dory was a nice addition to the trips and gave a completely different ride than the rubber rafts. Everyone really enjoyed being able to paddle one day, ride in the dory the next, and relax in a rubber raft the next.

Grand Canyon, a poem by

Amil Quayle

Grand Canyon

I speak now of that Grand Canyon
which lies within each of us. There
are pre-Cambrian rocks at the center,
the core, and talus from yesterday’s fall;
marble and granite grown hard from the
pressure and heat of heartbreak and
passion; crumbling sandstone, layer on
layer of sediment, sentiment piled on
over a lifetime’s experience. The sun
bursts on us each morning then dies
and we are in darkness, but moon shadows
tease our walls. We listen to the pulsating
rhythm of time’s river lapping at our
shores. The sandy places slide, diffuse,
move closer to the sea. A billion years
of erosion is magnifed, demagnifed into
sixty or seventy years as we measure time.
Perhaps in a million years your shinbone
will be a fossil in another Grand Canyon,
cold in a bed of rock next to mine.

This poem is from “Grand Canyon and other Selected Poems,” by Amil Quayle, who has run the Grand Canyon for most of his life. The book is available from our office at a cost of $15.00. If you would like one, give us a call at 1-800-253-7328.

What does CRATE stand for in the rafting world?

CRATE boats camped across from Deer Creek

"CRATE" rafts and crew after an incredible day at Deer Creek Falls

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions is our official company name. Most of our friends and guests over the years refer to our rafting company as CRATE. CRATE is an acronym that stands for Colorado River & Trail Expeditions. When our company first formed in 1971 the only section of river we ran was the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. In addition to rafting we also led backpacking trips into the Grand Canyon and did overnight hiking trips away from the river. As time progressed we expanded throughout Utah and Alaska running different rivers and seeing more incredible places. We eventually quit doing the backpacking tours, but kept the focus on off river hiking in conjunction with our whitewater rafting. We like to get up early on our rafting expeditions and make the most of each and everyday. When taking part in a Grand Canyon rafting expedition the off-river side canyons are just as impressive as the main corridor itself. If you have ever watched one of our rafts pass under the Kaibab Suspension Bridge, or sat atop the Grand Canyon skywalk peering down with binoculars you have noticed the very subtle “CRATE” sign at the front and back of our rafts. When you come down the river it will all be clear, and you like the 1000’s of people we have taken down the river will just call us CRATE. We run great river trips with the best and most organized rafts and river guides on the river.