Planning for a Multi-Day Desolation Canyon Trip

Looking for peaceful destination simply to unwind? Then look no further than Desolation Canyon. Have you not heard of the place before? This is one of the remotest spots of the popular Colorado Plateau, surrounded with picturesque landscapes and natural sceneries.

This area even becomes more stunning when you encounter the Green River that cuts through the Tavaputs Plateau. Desolation canyon is enriched with cottonwood trees and a wildlife. Additionally, the awe-inspiring sandy beaches make the place perfect for camping along the river.

So what about planning for a multi-day Desolation Canyon trip?

Multi-day trip 

This place offers great opportunity if you are looking for a 5 to 6 day river rafting trip on the Green River.  Besides the wonderful red rocks, Desolation Canyon also gives you various opportunities to view famous historical sites, hiking to beautiful places, and much more. 

Enjoy like never before, only at the Desolation Canyon.

 

Green River Raft Trips and Ray’s Tavern

Ray's Tavern Neon Sign Glows Brightly

Ray’s Tavern Neon Sign Glows Brightly

If you have ever been to Green River, Utah and not eaten at Ray’s Tavern consider yourself deprived.  Ray’s is famous for their hamburgers and home cut fries.  They also have a great selection of other grilled foods including Chicken and Pork Chops.  In the Colorado River & Trail Expeditions family it is customary to stop at Ray’s after our rafting trips and whenever we have a large contingent in Green River.  Usually the place is packed with over 100 people in the small inside dining room and the outside picnic benches.  It has been in Green River since 1946.

If you are coming on a Desolation Canyon river trip or Westwater Canyon Trip make sure to plan on a night at Ray’s before or after your river adventure.  You won’t be disappointed.  Rays is located at 25 Broadway.

Another great time to visit Green River and Ray’s Tavern is during Melon Days.  One year the CRATE crew was around town after a fall Cataract Canyon.  We hand carved a Melon Helmet and headed to the celebration.  It was a fun night and the Melon helmet was a hit.  Everyone in Ray’s wanted a chance to wear it.

Via Magazine Highlights Green River

Via, the magazine of AAA recently did a rafting trip with Colorado River and Trail Expeditions on the 1-day section of Gray Canyon.  The river trip was in conjunction with a weekender article about heading to Green River, Utah and exploring the area.  Other attractions listed in the article included the “Good Water Rim Trial”, “Crystal Geyser”, the “John Wesley Powell River History Museum,” and “Goblin Valley State Park.”

The trip leader on the trip was Alex Jensen and is quoted in the article calling Green River and Gray Canyon “a special place that no one knows about.”  We think Alex’s description of the area is right on.  Green River is a special place that is often less crowded and overlooked due to the popularity of nearby Moab.  The area has a remote beauty to it and the Green River 1-day section is as good of a river trip as the Colorado River 1-Day section above Moab.

Colorado River & Trail Expeditions generally meets our guests in Green River, Utah for their trips on the Green River as well as many of our Westwater Canyon river trips on the Colorado River.

“The Cataract of Lodore” a poem by Robert Southey

What Andy Hall and JW Powell Saw in 1869

Green River in Lodore Canyon

When the First Powell Expedition reached the end of Brown’s Park on the Green River they came to a deep canyon with swiftwater and rapids. It reminded Andy Hall of a poem named “The Cataract of Lodore.” John Wesley Powell knew the poem by heart and recited it. The expedition decided to name the canyon after the poem, and the name stuck. The canyon is located on the Green River above Desolation Canyon. The canyon was home to the first real rapids that Powell and his men encountered, and they lost one boat in Disaster Falls. The poem was written in 1820.

The Cataract of Lodore by William Southey(written in 1820)

“How does the water
Come down at Lodore?”
My little boy asked me
Thus, once on a time;
And moreover he tasked me
To tell him in rhyme.
Anon, at the word,
There first came one daughter,
And then came another,
To second and third
The request of their brother,
And to hear how the water
Comes down at Lodore,
With its rush and its roar,
As many a time
They had seen it before.
So I told them in rhyme,
For of rhymes I had store;
And ’twas in my vocation
For their recreation
That so I should sing;
Because I was Laureate
To them and the King.

From its sources which well
In the tarn on the fell;
From its fountains
In the mountains,
Its rills and its gills;
Through moss and through brake,
It runs and it creeps
For a while, till it sleeps
In its own little lake.
And thence at departing,
Awakening and starting,
It runs through the reeds,
And away it proceeds,
Through meadow and glade,
In sun and in shade,
And through the wood-shelter,
Among crags in its flurry,
Helter-skelter,
Hurry-skurry.
Here it comes sparkling,
And there it lies darkling;
Now smoking and frothing
Its tumult and wrath in,
Till, in this rapid race
On which it is bent,
It reaches the place
Of its steep descent.

The cataract strong
Then plunges along,
Striking and raging
As if a war waging
Its caverns and rocks among;
Rising and leaping,
Sinking and creeping,
Swelling and sweeping,
Showering and springing,
Flying and flinging,
Writhing and ringing,
Eddying and whisking,
Spouting and frisking,
Turning and twisting,
Around and around
With endless rebound:
Smiting and fighting,
A sight to delight in;
Confounding, astounding,
Dizzying and deafening the ear with its sound.

Collecting, projecting,
Receding and speeding,
And shocking and rocking,
And darting and parting,
And threading and spreading,
And whizzing and hissing,
And dripping and skipping,
And hitting and splitting,
And shining and twining,
And rattling and battling,
And shaking and quaking,
And pouring and roaring,
And waving and raving,
And tossing and crossing,
And flowing and going,
And running and stunning,
And foaming and roaming,
And dinning and spinning,
And dropping and hopping,
And working and jerking,
And guggling and struggling,
And heaving and cleaving,
And moaning and groaning;

And glittering and frittering,
And gathering and feathering,
And whitening and brightening,
And quivering and shivering,
And hurrying and skurrying,
And thundering and floundering;

Dividing and gliding and sliding,
And falling and brawling and sprawling,
And driving and riving and striving,
And sprinkling and twinkling and wrinkling,
And sounding and bounding and rounding,
And bubbling and troubling and doubling,
And grumbling and rumbling and tumbling,
And clattering and battering and shattering;

Retreating and beating and meeting and sheeting,
Delaying and straying and playing and spraying,
Advancing and prancing and glancing and dancing,
Recoiling, turmoiling and toiling and boiling,
And gleaming and streaming and steaming and beaming,
And rushing and flushing and brushing and gushing,
And flapping and rapping and clapping and slapping,
And curling and whirling and purling and twirling,
And thumping and plumping and bumping and jumping,
And dashing and flashing and splashing and clashing;
And so never ending, but always descending,
Sounds and motions for ever and ever are blending
All at once and all o’er, with a mighty uproar, –
And this way the water comes down at Lodore.